Group Messaging/Chat continues to expand, as each challenger battles its competitors. Here’s where we stand.

Slack and Teams Stay Neck-and-Neck

These two are ‘the’ names when it comes to ChatOps (business-grade chat/messaging platforms).

Slack VS Teams
“En garde, Slack!” “I say, Teams!”

Teams continues to expand its user base. It’s up to 200,000 organizations as of March 2018. But we don’t know how many individual users that is; Microsoft hasn’t said. It has huge potential to grow further, especially once it’s finished absorbing Skype for Business by end of year (give or take).

Conversely, Slack has more than 6 million daily active users! 2 million of these are paying customers. Even without the free tier, Slack stomps all over Teams in terms of business usage.

Two heavyweights battling it out encourages good competition and ultimately benefits the user. However, the market has more contenders…and they aren’t sitting idle either.

Integration Comes to Workplace (though Slack and Teams are Well Ahead)

Facebook’s Workplace just added an integration feature with a bunch of potential add-ons. Thanks to the integration, Workplace users can now connect services like Microsoft SharePoint, Hubspot, Jira (project management), and so on.

Workplace by Facebook LogoThe full list is here: Workplace Integrations.

While this is a welcome move, it’s also a catch-up move. Slack and Teams have had third-party integration capabilities almost since inception. They also have many more integrations available.

Looks like Facebook wants to keep Workplace as a separate, work-friendly brand. If so, they’ll continue to face an uphill battle, due to the Cambridge Analytica scandal and ongoing privacy concerns. Because of these concerns, my Workplace trial ended with the question of whether businesses would try Workplace out.

So far, it would appear they have. At least 30,000 businesses now use Workplace. Still in third place, and they’ll have to keep pushing. But the user count does put Workplace in striking range of Teams. A new theater has opened up in Facebook vs. Microsoft.

Other Competitors Nipping at the Big Dogs’ Heels

There’s more than just Workplace to watch out for though. I’ve mentioned Atlassian Stride and Google Hangouts on this blog before. What’s going on with them?

Atlassian StrideStride (formerly HipChat) hit General Availability in March. As it’s so new, user numbers aren’t readily available. I’m curious to see how this one goes…it looks near-identical to Teams, although some beta users complained about audio/video quality.

Google split Hangouts in two last year, creating Hangouts Meet (video meetings) and Hangouts Chat (group chats, like Slack/Teams). Not sure why they split them, but hey, I don’t work at Google.Google Hangouts Icon

This strikes me as an after-the-fact change…after Slack roared past Hangouts, they had to race to keep up. However, there are two smart moves within the split:

  1. Voice is part of Meet only. Google restricted Chat to…chat. Meet focuses on video calls, of which voice is just a part, but it centralizes the audio/video experience into one app. Makes it easy to know which app to use.
  2. Google integrated Hangouts Meet/Chat into the G-Suite. Like Teams is part of Office 365, Hangouts Meet & Chat are there for G-Suite business users. The tactic worked for Teams; I bet Google’s hoping this will work for Hangouts.

The Reason Behind the Battle: Chat’s Multi-Generational Appeal

Why is chat so popular all of a sudden? I think it’s because chat is an intergenerational medium. It’s something the past few generations have grown up using. It’s also something that’s ‘grown up’ through successive generations of the technology.

In the Internet’s early days you had BBSes and IRC.
Then along came AIM, ICQ, and Yahoo Messenger.
Next came Skype, Facebook, and WhatsApp.
Now we have Slack, Stride, Teams, Fuze, Hangouts, and several more.

Each generation had a chat platform for communication. Chat itself went through generations, advancing in capability, expanding in reach. Now we have a generation of chat platforms that can handle almost any form of communication.

arm wrestling photo
Hey hey, no cheating!
Photo by mcgrayjr

But it’s all centered around the oldest, simplest, and most familiar communication method most of us have ever known…plain, direct, text-to-text messaging.

Where the Battle Goes Next: Long-Term Teamwork Value

ChatOps have one mission: to facilitate teamwork. You can generally tell how well they do this by adoption and frequency of use.

However, short-term numbers aren’t the best indication of value to a team. Long-term adoption rates, after the novelty wears off and the team becomes accustomed to using the platform, determine who will win the “ChatOps War.”

So far, Slack and Hangouts have been around the longest. Between those two, people obviously prefer Slack. It has greater long-term teamwork value. Teams and Workplace are coming up, and Stride is a wildcard. By this time next year, we may see the triumph of Teams, the emergence of Stride, or another challenger rise.

Which ChatOps platform does your workplace use? What are your thoughts on it?

Scenes from the ChatOps War
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